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Antioxidants





For instance, the antioxidant support Retinol or Vitamin A (or beta-carotene) are found in dark green, yellow, and orange vegetables and fruits. In fact, it is the antioxidant support found in these fruits that protect them from solar radiation damage. Another antioxidant support, ascorbic acid or Vitamin C is a water soluble compound that is found in citrus fruits, green peppers, broccoli, green leafy vegetables, strawberries, raw cabbage, and tomatoes. 

After all, they are part of the natural cycle of life. But what isn't natural is disease. They are disorders - unnatural conditions of the body. Aging is caused by harmful molecules called "free radicals." This was according to Denham Harman, M.D., Ph.D., who first proposed the theory in the 1950s. 

For the past decade, countless studies have been devoted to the beneficial effects of antioxidant enzymes. It has been found that a substantial link exists between free radicals and more than sixty different health conditions, including the aging process, cancer, and atherosclerosis. By reducing exposure to free radicals and increasing the intake of antioxidant enzyme rich foods or antioxidant enzyme supplements, your body's potential to reducing the risk of free radical-related health problems is made more palpable. 

Some of the basic food groups that prove to be rich sources of antioxidant vitamins are the following: Breads, cereals, pasta, and starchy vegetables (such as potatoes, yam, squash, etc.) Fruits and vegetables Fat-free milk and low-fat dairy products Lean meat, fish, and poultry Incidentally, if you pattern your diet after this basic food group, you not only ingest a high level of natural antioxidant vitamins, but you also keep fat buildup in your body. 

Note that it says "molecules" so that means free radicals don't make the distinction between foreign bodies and healthy cells. And when free radicals start attacking the body's own cells, you can guess what the results are - Aging. If only there was a way to get rid of those harmful free radicals. 

This proves that while it is still early to say that honey can be a dietary antioxidant, it does point out its vast potential in terms of antioxidant properties. Principal researcher Nicki Engeseth, a professor of food chemistry in the University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer, and Environmenal Sciences, agrees with this.