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Antioxidants Up in the Club





Oxygen radicals are everywhere because we live in an atmosphere that contains oxygen. Oxidation is a process that naturally occurs in the body and a natural consequence of it are the radical particles that have since been dubbed as "free radicals." Scientists point to these so-called free radicals as the culprits when it comes to most degenerative diseases. 

To achieve maximum stability, free radicals therefore steal electrons from other molecules around them and in so doing, destroy the cell membranes and weaken the cell. Free radicals cause a chain reaction of "electron stealing" because the minute they start taking away electrons from other molecules, those molecules become free radicals themselves. 

Multiple antioxidants tend to work synergistically and far more effectively when they are taken together than when they are taken as a single antioxidant. Most antioxidant supplements you find in health stores today contain a standard ingredient base. Antioxidant supplements generally contain vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, and the mineral selenium. 

When there are eight electrons in an orbit, it means that that particular orbit (or shell as it is called) is full which further means the atom is stable. Stable atoms tend not to enter into chemical reactions. Because atoms seek to reach a state of maximum stability, an atom will try to fill its shell with electrons by: Gaining or losing electrons to either fill or empty its outer shell Sharing its electrons by bonding together with other atoms in order to complete its outer shell Free Radicals: The Formation The free radicals are formed when weak bonds between atoms are split. 

On the other hand, the programmed theories are primarily concerned with the genetics of how long and how efficient our cells can maintain optimum health. This antioxidant antiaging therapy looks at intrinsic aging which is aging due to the rate of passing time. What are the benefits of antioxidant antiaging? 

The Top 20 list of antioxidants published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows the ranks of the capacity of berry foods, fruits, and vegetables to interfere with or prevent oxidative processes where free radicals are formed. Ronald L. Prior, a USDA nutritionist and research chemist based in Little Rock, Ark explains that berry antioxidants were ranked according to their total antioxidant capacity.