BizeLion.net



Dr. Mercola Interviews Ginny Bank on Antioxidants (Part 1 of 5)





By neutralizing free radicals, antioxidants actually prevent the onset of these diseases and at the same time keep the body healthy and strong. Being natural substances, antioxidants are derived from various plants, including vegetables and fruits. Blueberries and cranberries are usually the fruits that are often touted by nutrition scientists as the top antioxidant rich foods. 

When free radicals start stealing electrons from healthy cells, that process causes many disorders to occur in the body. The cells will grow weak until they are eventually destroyed. Hence, diseases such as cardiovascular disease, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, senility, and cancer are often attributed to the contributing factor of free radicals. 

Free radicals actually play an important role in a number of biological processes, some of which are necessary for life, such as intracellular killing of bacteria by neutrophil granulocytes. They have also been implicated in certain cell signaling processes. The two most important oxygen-centered free radicals are superoxide and hydroxyl radical. 

"This is significant because free radicals can destroy cell membranes and damage DNA, and may be a root cause of certain types of cancer, heart disease, and even the aging process itself." The findings of this study on antioxidant red grapes may also help explain the scientific logic behind the French paradox - why the French have less risk of heart disease even when they eat the richest types of food. 

Oxidation is a process that naturally occurs in the body and a natural consequence of it are the radical particles that have since been dubbed as "free radicals." Scientists point to these so-called free radicals as the culprits when it comes to most degenerative diseases. Free radicals are blamed for even the simplest of illnesses, such as colds. 

It was observed in both studies that while the meat browned during cooking more extensively than traditionally preserved products, taste was not negatively affected. For the other study, Engeseth worked with yet another colleague, Nele Gheldof, a doctoral student in the department of food science and human nutrition.